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Luis Mediero     Other 
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Luis Mediero published an article in December 2018.
Research Keywords & Expertise
0 A
0 Climate Change
0 Europe
0 Spain
0 Drought
0 water scarcity
Top co-authors See all
Luis Garrote

99 shared publications

Department of Civil Engineering: Hydraulics, Energy and Environment, Technical University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain

Fateh Chebana

44 shared publications

Professor, Institut National de la recherche scientifique, Centre Eau-Terre-Environnement, 490 rue de la couronne, Québec, QC, Canada G1K 1A9

Carlos H. R. Lima

18 shared publications

Universidade de Brasília; Brasília Brazil

Alvaro Sordo-Ward

16 shared publications

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid

M. Spiliotis

11 shared publications

Department of Civil Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, Xanthi, Greece

29
Publications
44
Reads
2
Downloads
353
Citations
Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2007 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
15
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Links between different classes of storm tracks and the flood trends in Spain Marcus Suassuna Santos, Luis Mediero, Carlos Henrique Ribeir... Published: 01 December 2018
Journal of Hydrology, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2018.10.003
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 7 Citations Climate-driven variability in the occurrence of major floods across North America and Europe Glenn A. Hodgkins, Paul H. Whitfield, Donald H. Burn, Jamie ... Published: 01 September 2017
Journal of Hydrology, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2017.07.027
DOI See at publisher website
Article 2 Reads 44 Citations Changing climate shifts timing of European floods Günter Blöschl, Julia Hall, Juraj Parajka, Rui A. P. Perdigã... Published: 10 August 2017
Science, doi: 10.1126/science.aan2506
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 15 Citations The European 2015 drought from a hydrological perspective Gregor Laaha, Tobias Gauster, Lena M. Tallaksen, Jean-Philip... Published: 22 June 2017
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, doi: 10.5194/hess-21-3001-2017
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
In 2015 large parts of Europe were affected by drought. In this paper, we analyze the hydrological footprint (dynamic development over space and time) of the drought of 2015 in terms of both severity (magnitude) and spatial extent and compare it to the extreme drought of 2003. Analyses are based on a range of low flow and hydrological drought indices derived for about 800 streamflow records across Europe, collected in a community effort based on a common protocol. We compare the hydrological footprints of both events with the meteorological footprints, in order to learn from similarities and differences of both perspectives and to draw conclusions for drought management. The region affected by hydrological drought in 2015 differed somewhat from the drought of 2003, with its center located more towards eastern Europe. In terms of low flow magnitude, a region surrounding the Czech Republic was the most affected, with summer low flows that exhibited return intervals of 100 years and more. In terms of deficit volumes, the geographical center of the event was in southern Germany, where the drought lasted a particularly long time. A detailed spatial and temporal assessment of the 2015 event showed that the particular behavior in these regions was partly a result of diverging wetness preconditions in the studied catchments. Extreme droughts emerged where preconditions were particularly dry. In regions with wet preconditions, low flow events developed later and tended to be less severe. For both the 2003 and 2015 events, the onset of the hydrological drought was well correlated with the lowest flow recorded during the event (low flow magnitude), pointing towards a potential for early warning of the severity of streamflow drought. Time series of monthly drought indices (both streamflow- and climate-based indices) showed that meteorological and hydrological events developed differently in space and time, both in terms of extent and severity (magnitude). These results emphasize that drought is a hazard which leaves different footprints on the various components of the water cycle at different spatial and temporal scales. The difference in the dynamic development of meteorological and hydrological drought also implies that impacts on various water-use sectors and river ecology cannot be informed by climate indices alone. Thus, an assessment of drought impacts on water resources requires hydrological data in addition to drought indices based solely on climate data. The transboundary scale of the event also suggests that additional efforts need to be undertaken to make timely pan-European hydrological assessments more operational in the future.
Article 0 Reads 7 Citations The European 2015 drought from a hydrological perspective Gregor Laaha, Tobias Gauster, Lena M. Tallaksen, Jean-Philip... Published: 26 July 2016
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Discussions, doi: 10.5194/hess-2016-366
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
In 2015 large parts of Europe were affected by a drought. In two companion papers we summarize a collaborative initiative of members of UNESCO’s EURO FRIEND-Water program to perform a timely pan-European assessment of the event. In this second paper, we analyse the event of 2015 relative to the event of 2003 based on streamflow observations. Analyses are based on range of low flow and hydrological drought indices for about 800 records across Europe that were collected in a community effort based on a common protocol. We compare the hydrological footprints of both events with the meteorological footprints presented by Ionita et al. (2016), in order to learn from similarities and differences of both perspectives and to draw conclusions for drought management. Overall, the hydrological drought of 2015 is characterised by a different spatial extent than the drought of 2003. In terms of low flow magnitude, a region around the Czech Republic was most affected with annual low flows that exhibited return intervals of 100 years and more. In terms of deficit volumes, the geographical centre of the event was in the area of Southern Germany where the drought lasted particularly long. A detailed assessment at various spatial and temporal scales showed that the different behaviour in these regions was also a result of diverging wetness preconditions in the catchments. Extreme droughts emerged where antecedent conditions were particularly dry. In regions with wet preconditions, low flow events developed later, and were mostly less severe. The space-time patterns of monthly low flow characteristics show that meteorological and hydrological events spread differently across Europe, and they evolved differently in regard to extent and severity. The results underline that drought is a hazard that leaves different footprints on the various components of the water cycle, on different spatial and temporal scales. The different dynamic development of major hydrometeorological characteristics, temperature and precipitation anomalies versus the streamflow magnitude, duration and deficit volume also determine differences in the impacts of hydrological drought on various water use sectors and on river ecology. For an assessment of drought impacts on water resources, therefore, hydrological data is required in addition to the hydro-meteorological drought indices. Additional efforts with a pan-European dimension need to be undertaken to make timely hydrological assessments more operational in the future.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations A bivariate trend analysis to investigate the effect of increasing urbanisation on flood characteristics Ana I. Requena, Ilaria Prosdocimi, Thomas R. Kjeldsen, Luis ... Published: 01 July 2016
Water Policy, doi: 10.2166/nh.2016.105
DOI See at publisher website
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